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Functions of the adductor brevis muscle

Functions and anatomy of the adductor brevis muscle shown with 3D model animation.

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Transcript

Hi everyone! This is Joao from Kenhub, and welcome to this tutorial where we will be covering the functions of the adductor brevis muscle. You can see this muscle now isolated on the screen. The adductor brevis muscle belongs to the adductor group of muscles and is located in the medial compartment of the thigh. This compartment is located on the inside of your thigh closest to the midline of the body. The adductor brevis muscle can be found deep to the pectineus and adductor longus muscles but superficial to the adductor magnus muscle.

The adductor brevis muscle is the smallest and shortest of the adductor muscle group. As it approaches its distal attachment, the muscle widens in shape. The muscles of the medial thigh – the adductor muscles – in, general, all innervated by the obturator nerve. The adductor brevis muscle is no different and it is innervated by branches of the anterior division of the obturator nerve. Also useful for practical exams is the root value of this nerve. The root values of the obturator nerve are L2, L3, and L4.

The adductor brevis muscle has its proximal attachment or origin on both the body and the inferior ramus of the pubic bone and then attaches distally or inserts onto the pectineal line and the proximal part of the linea aspera of the femur.

In terms of the actions of the adductor brevis muscle, this muscle acts on your hip joint. The adductor brevis muscle belongs to the adductor muscle group and its main action is to then adduct the thigh. You can see on the screen now an example of the adduction movement. This movement occurs when the thigh is pulled medially and moves towards and pass the midline of the body or median plane.

As you can see on the screen, adduction can also occur after the hip has been abducted and results in the thigh returning to the anatomical position. We can see the adduction movement from a more posterior angle on the screen now. This is helpful to understand how the insertion of the adductor brevis on the femur is integral to its action. The adduction movement is an action which is required when you are turning a corner while riding a motorcycle or bicycle, for example, since the thighs are pressed together or when kicking with the medial side of the foot, for example, in soccer or football.

The adductor brevis muscle assists in the flexion of the thigh at the hip joint. Flexion occurs when the distance between the torso and the anterior thigh decreases. This is the action that you can see on the screen now. This action is required when an individual is running.

The extent to which the adductor brevis muscle is involved in movements other than adduction is a contentious issue, however, the general consensus is that the adductor brevis muscle does assist primarily in lateral rotation of the thigh at the hip joint. Lateral rotation of the hip is not a primary function of the adductor brevis muscle but it is listed in a number of anatomical texts, so keep that in mind. As you can see on the screen, lateral rotation of the thigh occurs when the knee and the foot are moved outwards away from the body.

The posterior view of this action can be seen on the screen now and for those interested out there, there are numerous research papers available for further reading the ongoing discussion of the ancillary functions of this muscle.

So, in summary, the adductor brevis muscle acts on the hip joint as part of the adductor group of muscles and is responsible for adduction of the thigh. This is an action involved in kicking with the medial side of the foot. The adductor brevis muscle also assists in flexion of the thigh at the hip which is an action that is required when running. The rotational actions of the adductor brevis are contentious but the consensus is that it assists in lateral rotation of the thigh at the hip. There is research widely available on this topic for those who are interested in further reading, don’t forget that.

And this, my friends, concludes the video tutorial on the functions of the adductor brevis muscle. Thanks for watching and I will see you on the next one.

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