EN | DE | PT Get help How to study Login Register

Supraorbital artery: want to learn more about it?

Our engaging videos, interactive quizzes, in-depth articles and HD atlas are here to get you top results faster.

What do you prefer to learn with?

“I would honestly say that Kenhub cut my study time in half.” – Read more. Kim Bengochea Kim Bengochea, Regis University, Denver

Supraorbital artery

The supraorbital artery stems from the ophthalmic artery in the superomedial aspect of the orbit. It leaves the orbit through the supraorbital groove and emerges onto the forehead. It terminates by dividing into two terminal branches; superficial and deep. 

The supraorbital artery supplies the periosteum of the frontal bone, the skin of the forehead, as well as the superior rectus and levator palpebrae superioris muscles. Its terminal branches form anastomotic networks with their contralateral counterparts; the supratrochlear and superficial temporal arteries.

This article will discuss the anatomy and function of the supraorbital artery.

Key facts about the supraorbital artery
Origin Ophthalmic artery
Branches Superficial branch, deep branch 
Supply Periosteum of the frontal bone, skin of the forehead, superior rectus, levator palpebrae superioris muscle

Contents
  1. Course
  2. Branches and supply
+ Show all

Course

The supraorbital artery originates from the ophthalmic artery in the orbital fossa. Immediately after branching off, it crosses the optic nerve  then runs anterolaterally along the medial border of the levator palpebrae superioris and superior rectus muscles.

The artery exits the orbit through the supraorbital foramen (supraorbital groove) and emerges onto the forehead. Upon reaching the superciliary arch of the frontal bone, it divides into two terminal branches (superficial and deep) that spread across the frontal periosteum.

Branches and supply

The supraorbital artery has two terminal branches; superficial and deep. These branches supply the periosteum of the frontal bone and the adjacent skin. Additionally, they supply the muscles of the eye and upper eyelid, including superior rectus and levator palpebrae superioris muscles. 

The supraorbital artery forms anastomoses with its contralateral counterpart, the supratrochlear and superficial temporal arteries. 

Learn more about the blood vessels of the orbit with our articles, videos, labeled diagrams and quizzes.

Supraorbital artery: want to learn more about it?

Our engaging videos, interactive quizzes, in-depth articles and HD atlas are here to get you top results faster.

What do you prefer to learn with?

“I would honestly say that Kenhub cut my study time in half.” – Read more. Kim Bengochea Kim Bengochea, Regis University, Denver

Show references

References

  • Moore, K. L., Dalley, A. F., & Agur, A. M. R. (2014). Clinically Oriented Anatomy (7th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
  • Netter, F. (2019). Atlas of Human Anatomy (7th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Saunders.
  • Standring, S. (2016). Gray's Anatomy (41tst ed.). Edinburgh: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone.
  • Tubbs, R. S., Shoja, M. M., Loukas, M., & Bergman, R. A. (2016). Bergman’s comprehensive encyclopedia of human anatomic variation. Hoboken: Wiley Blackwell.

Illustrators:

  • Supraorbital artery (Arteria supraorbitalis) - Paul Kim
© Unless stated otherwise, all content, including illustrations are exclusive property of Kenhub GmbH, and are protected by German and international copyright laws. All rights reserved.

Register now and grab your free ultimate anatomy study guide!