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Femoral nerve: want to learn more about it?

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Femoral nerve

Femoral nerve (Nervus femoralis)

The femoral nerve is a mixed nerve of the lower limb that innervates the muscles and skin of the hip and thigh. The femoral nerve originates from the lumbar plexus, from the ventral rami of L2-L4 spinal nerves. In fact, it is the longest branch of the lumbar plexus.

The femoral nerve splits into two of its major divisions: anterior and posterior. These divisions give motor and sensory branches:

  • The motor branches of the femoral nerve are the muscular branches, nerve to pectineus, and nerve to sartorius. They innervate the flexors of the hip (pectineus, iliacus, sartorius) and the extensors of the knee (quadriceps femoris).
  • The sensory branches of the femoral nerve are the medial femoral cutaneous nerve of thigh, intermediate femoral cutaneous nerve of thigh, as well as the saphenous nerve which is the terminal branch of the femoral nerve. These nerves innervate the skin of the anteromedial thigh and medial sides of the leg and foot.

In this article, we will discuss the anatomy and function of the femoral nerve.

Key facts about the femoral nerve
Origin Lumbar plexus (L2-L4)
Branches Motor: muscular branches, nerve to pectineus, nerve to sartorius
Sensory: medial femoral cutaneous nerve of thigh, intermediate femoral cutaneous nerve of thigh, saphenous nerve
Supply - Flexors of the hip: pectineus, iliacus, sartorius
- Extensors of the knee: quadriceps femoris
- Skin of anteromedial thigh, skin of medial leg and foot

Course

The femoral nerve is the largest branch of the lumbar plexus and provides motor innervation to the anterior thigh (quadriceps). It arises from the posterior cords of the lumbar plexus (L2-L4), contrasting with the obturator nerve, which arises from the anterior cords (L2-L4) and supplies the medial compartment of the thigh (adductor magnus, adductor longus and adductor brevis muscles). 

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The femoral nerve emerges lateral to psoas major, and descends to pass beneath the inguinal ligament at approximately its mid-point. It passes through the femoral triangle lateral to the femoral artery and vein.

You can use the mnemonic NAVY to remember the content order of the femoral triangle, from lateral to medial: 

  • Nerve
  • Artery
  • Vein
  • lYmphatics (femoral canal)

Once it passes beneath the inguinal ligament, it divides into a deep and superficial branch. The deep branch supplies the quadriceps. The superficial branch divides into the medial cutaneous and anterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh. The nerve terminates as the sensory saphenous nerve, in the gaiter region of the leg.

Learn more about the lumbar plexus branches here:

Motor role

The first motor branch innervates iliacus. This muscle, in conjunction with the psoas major, causes medial rotation of the hip. The deep branch of the femoral nerve then descends to supply the sartorius (the tailor’s muscle). Once it passes through the femoral canal (as the most lateral structure of the neurovascular bundle), it supplies the pectineus, a small muscle in the medial compartment of the thigh. Finally, the nerve supplies the four heads of the quadriceps femoris (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius and rectus femoris).

The overall functions of the femoral nerve are hip flexion (mainly via illiacus but also pectineus, sartorius and rectus femoris) and knee extension (via quadriceps). Both these movements are essential for walking and straightening one’s leg in any context (kicking a football, jumping etc). In the terminal stages of knee extension, it also causes a degree of medial rotation that results in locking of the knee (this is due to the larger, more rounded, and more forward projecting medial condyle).

Sensory role

The superficial branch of the femoral nerve first gives rise to the anterior and medial cutaneous nerves of the thigh. They supply sensation over the anterior and median region of the thigh. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve is a separate sensory nerve arising from L2 and L3, and supplies sensation over the lateral thigh.

The terminal branch is the saphenous nerve, which passes through the adductor canal with the femoral vessels and supplies sensation over the region of the greater saphenous nerve in the gaiter region. As well as its sensory innervation, the femoral nerve also innervates the capsule of the hip joint, and allows for proprioceptive feedback about the joint.

Try out our quiz to test your knowledge about the supply of the lower extremity:

Embryology

It may seem counter intuitive that the femoral nerve (the nerve of the anterior thigh) arises from the posterior cords of the lumbar plexus. The answer to this contradiction can be found in embryology. Unlike the upper limb, the lower limb rotates 180 degrees. As a result, the anterior nerve derives its roots from the posterior cords, and vice versa for the obturator. In fact, the lumbar nerve roots for these nerves are also odd, as the thigh muscles are not lumbar structures. During embryological development the thigh muscles migrate from the lumbar area and carry their innervation with them, hence L1-L4.

Femoral nerve: want to learn more about it?

Our engaging videos, interactive quizzes, in-depth articles and HD atlas are here to get you top results faster.

What do you prefer to learn with?

“I would honestly say that Kenhub cut my study time in half.” – Read more. Kim Bengochea Kim Bengochea, Regis University, Denver

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